Welle Training


How to Communicate with a Resistant Person

Course Number
1003a
Price
42.00
Overview

When someone is under stress and exhibiting behaviors on the Lalemand Red Behavior Scale, we need to be very careful how we communicate to avoid further escalation. Sometimes our communication is imprecise and sometimes we use words that make our requests less effective. In these situations, the individual may become confused and respond with resistance. In this module, we will discuss how to make a clear request to avoid being misunderstood by someone unde r stress. someone is under stress and exhibiting behaviors on the Lalemand Red Behavior Scale, we need to be very careful how we communicate to avoid further escalation. Sometimes our communication is imprecise and sometimes we use words that make our requests less effective. In these situations, the individual may become confused and respond with resistance. In this module, we will discuss how to make a clear request to avoid being misunderstood by someone under stress.

Making a Clear Request

When someone is under stress and exhibiting escalating behaviors, we need to be very careful how we communicate to avoid further escalation. Sometimes our communication is imprecise and sometimes we use words that make our requests less effective. In these situations, the individual may become confused and respond with resistance. In this module, we will discuss how to make a clear request to avoid being misunderstood by someone under stress.

Keeping a Conversation of Track

Sometimes when asking individuals to do different tasks you are met with resistance. Individuals may avoid doing what you ask of them by changing the subject, attempting to distract you, or playing word games. When faced with resistance, people typically do one of two things; they either give up and walk away or launch into argument. These behaviors are ineffective and do not accomplish your goal. This module will give you the tools necessary to keep a conversation on track and accomplish the task at hand.

Offering Choices

When someone in your care is being resistant or trying to avoid responsibility, you can offer positive choices to replace unwanted behavior. Providing choices helps the individual feel in control which usually results in better outcomes. We will discuss the sentence structure to use when offering choices, a format known as Choice A/B. For this technique to work, you must be persistent but not controlling, and use positive words and body language to make the choices more appealing.

 

Objective

Making a Clear Request

  • Demonstrate a simple, straightforward request
  •  Identify words and phrases to avoid when making a clear request
  • Describe the importance of treating individuals with dignity and respect
  •  Describe the benefit of making positive requests over negative requests, and
  • Describe the importance of making directed and observable requests.
Keeping a Conversation on Track
  • Describe techniques for preventing self-escalation and argument
  •  Describe how to present a professional demeanor when under stress
  • Define Planned Persistence and provide examples of this technique
  • Define Tactful Interruption and provide examples of this technique
  • Define Creating the Expectation of Cooperation and provide examples of this technique
Offering Choices 
  • Demonstrate a clear choice during a high stress situation
  • Describe ways to prevent escalation
  • Describe the benefit of providing positive choices instead of using threats or bribes
  • Describe how offering choices is a trauma informed approach
  • Define the Choice A/B Format
  
Course Hours
3.00
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